New York restaurateurs were inundated with orders on Tuesday during Grubhub's $15 free meals promotion, many of whose kitchens were inundated with food tickets (pictured).  Owners say they weren't notified of the promotion and their businesses suffered from understaffing, no delivery drivers and wasted food

New York restaurant owners say they missed GrubHub’s warning about its disastrous $15 free lunch promotion

New York restaurateurs say they missed GrubHub’s warning about a $15 free lunch promotion that swamped them with orders before they were forced to throw away tons of food.

The meal delivery app told the Today Show that it offered “advance notice” to restaurants, but demand dashed expectations as thousands of hungry New Yorkers ordered. At its peak, up to 6,000 customers per minute were placing orders, with video that emerged Friday showing a restaurant’s printer spitting out dozens of orders as staff looked on in amazement.

However, restaurateurs say they received no advance notice and their kitchens and staff were overwhelmed with so many orders they couldn’t fulfill them, and even if they could, there was no one there. to deliver them.

GrubHub’s free lunch promotion – which ran from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. – caused restaurants to throw away thousands of meals as delivery drivers couldn’t keep up with the high demand for orders on Tuesday.

The promotion was so popular that at one point GrubHub was averaging 6,000 orders per minute, GrubHub told DailyMail.com in a statement.

New York restaurateurs were inundated with orders on Tuesday during Grubhub's $15 free meals promotion, many of whose kitchens were inundated with food tickets (pictured).  Owners say they weren't notified of the promotion and their businesses suffered from understaffing, no delivery drivers and wasted food

New York restaurateurs were inundated with orders on Tuesday during Grubhub’s $15 free meals promotion, many of whose kitchens were inundated with food tickets (pictured). Owners say they weren’t notified of the promotion and their businesses suffered from understaffing, no delivery drivers and wasted food

Grubhub said in a statement to the Today Show that it warned restaurants ahead of the promotion, but did not expect New Yorkers to place 6,000 orders per minute.

Grubhub said in a statement to the Today Show that it warned restaurants ahead of the promotion, but did not expect New Yorkers to place 6,000 orders per minute.

Grubhub said in a statement to the Today Show that it warned restaurants ahead of the promotion, but did not expect New Yorkers to place 6,000 orders per minute.

The huge amount of orders even “temporarily overwhelmed” the app, but the problem was quickly resolved, GrubHub spokesman Christopher Krautler told MarketWatch.com.

Adding that the promotion “ultimately [helped] to boost activity for the thousands of restaurants still battling the pandemic. ‘

“We have seen an unprecedented amount [of orders]more than we’ve seen before with any promotion,” he said.

Several restaurants across the city were scrambling Tuesday, including Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken in Manhattan.

A restaurant manager told DailyMail.com that the promo code led to things chaotic yesterday, saying: ‘It was a disaster [on Tuesday].’

‘We did not know. We had no idea about this promotion,’ an official at Veselka, a Ukrainian restaurant in the East Village, told DailyMail.com on Tuesday.

“We could have tried to plan accordingly. We could have spoken to our delivery people to [they would have been prepared.]’

A Just Salad employee showed off all the orders that were wasted on Tuesday

Stacks of salad orders were apparently never picked up

A TikTok from user euffyxoxo appears to show dozens of abandoned salads at a Just Salad restaurant that were never recovered

The GrubHub promotion was so popular that the delivery service averaged 6,000 orders per minute on Tuesday, crushing delivery drivers and restaurants

The GrubHub promotion was so popular that the delivery service averaged 6,000 orders per minute on Tuesday, crushing delivery drivers and restaurants

“The drivers could not come here. We had orders ready to go but there were not enough delivery drivers. [Customers] called very frustrated, which is understandable, and at some point we stopped taking GrubHub orders,” the manager added.

At a Mexican restaurant in Harlem, an employee named Lily told Buzzfeed that because the restaurant’s delivery driver couldn’t keep up with demand, she was forced to order an Uber herself and deliver 11 orders. in person.

“INSANITY,” she told Buzzfeed of her day.

Brandon Ching, who worked the counter at Greenberg’s Bagels in Brooklyn, expressed the same sentiment, telling Buzzfeed, “It got overwhelming.”

“We were understaffed today so that really added extra stress to my day,” he added.

Customers wait in line to pick up their sandwiches at Greenberg's Bagels in Brooklyn on Tuesday

Customers wait in line to pick up their sandwiches at Greenberg’s Bagels in Brooklyn on Tuesday

SWEET GREEN, ASTOR PLACE: Historic number of orders at Sweet Green near Astor Place in New York after Grub Hub offers free $15 lunch to the whole city

SWEET GREEN, ASTOR PLACE: Historic number of orders at Sweet Green near Astor Place in New York after Grub Hub offers free $15 lunch to the whole city

VESELKA, EAST VILLAGE: A Veselka official told DailyMail.com they had to stop taking GrubHub orders because they weren't told about the promotion and didn't have enough delivery drivers

VESELKA, EAST VILLAGE: A Veselka official told DailyMail.com they had to stop taking GrubHub orders because they weren’t told about the promotion and didn’t have enough delivery drivers

But some restaurateurs have found a way to adapt to the madness, including Richie Romero, one of the owners of Zazzy’s Pizza in Manhattan.

He told MarketWatch that his midday business was 30 times busier because of the promotion, and 45 minutes after the deal expired, he was still delivering orders.

Romero said he even had to bring in additional staff to handle the influx of orders.

“It was monstrous,” he said of the surge in orders, but added that he anticipated the promotion would lead to a host of new customers in the future.

The intense number of orders in a city of 8 million people has left restaurateurs and delivery drivers overwhelmed, with some saying they are simply not equipped to meet such high demand for orders.

A TikTok from user euffyxoxo appears to show dozens of abandoned orders at a Just Salad restaurant that were never picked up.

‘If you’re wondering what a free lunch was like in New York this afternoon…. All that wasted food!’ she captioned the video.

Customers themselves have been short-circuited by the chaos, with some forced to wait hours for their food and others simply having to cancel their orders altogether.

Hundreds of frustrated New Yorkers took to Twitter on Tuesday to vent their frustrations.

“Two people who need to be fired today – the marketer whose idea this was and the social media manager who decided on this happy post knowing the utter chaos it has caused restaurants and businesses. customers,” tweeted Alyson Cadena.

Another user wrote: “…so rude a multimillion dollar corporation trying to be ‘relatable’ to NYC’ers mentioning Rangers because they ignore thousands of complaints about their janky app and promo bs today lol.

Among the most annoying complaints were Manhattan office workers who claimed their entire office missed lunch after placing bulk orders.

‘[Bull]shit **. I ordered over an hour ago. Still not there and the restaurant is closed now. I spent over an hour on the phone and talking. Y’all are scamming,’ a tweeter user accused the app.

Angry New Yorkers demanded their money back after they never received their orders or had to cancel them

Angry New Yorkers demanded their money back after they never received their orders or had to cancel them

“My place of work placed an order for us to be delivered at 12:30 p.m. We didn’t know there was a promo in place. It’s now 3:45 a.m. and I’m hungry AF. I work at the Navy Yard – walk for going to lunch would take up my whole break.

GrubHub launched the offer after conducting a survey that found that 81% of “full-time employees in New York City enjoy lunch more than they did before the pandemic,” but find it difficult to take a break in the middle of the day. .

According to the survey, based on a sample of 1,000 New Yorkers, those who responded said they often didn’t take breaks because they were busy during traditional lunches.

It also revealed that 60% of respondents believe taking a lunch break helps them reset during a hectic workday.

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